Open centrifuge for wetlab project

collaboration
centrifuge

#1

Hi everyone, a team from TU Delft (including @jurra) is building an open centrifuge, you can follow in their repo.

They’re currently testing some features and are welcoming any suggests/ideas for this phase. They put up some issues here:

Ideas are most welcome!


#2

At some point I’ve considered the following ideas for a self-balancing centrifuge.

If they turn out to be silly, I apologize :slight_smile:


This requires an axis that is allowed to move a little bit, and it won’t work if it is completely fixed. Discussed here: https://engineering.stackexchange.com/questions/6015/how-do-tire-balancing-beads-work

There are some patents on using fluids instead of solids for self-balancing, but the working principle may not be the same.

I thought that the nice thing about this is that if it was somehow possible to have the tubes spin slightly independently of each other, they might balance each other, without adding extra parts.

A seemingly nice read on centrifuges and stability
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5LSKmhBg6HoWVlLa3lQY1YyOGs/view?usp=drivesdk

Gaudilabs made a centrifuge out of old hard-disk drives.

Some rotors just float, by pushing air downwards or by other parts forcing air upwards (air-cushions maybe).

¿Are high speed magnetically accelerated rotors feasible? Like a magnetic stirrer on steroids.

A local centrifuge manufacturer in Argentina wolud have been worth consulting for some insight (or even funding).
http://www.rolcosrl.com/rolco.php?c=cen

Cheers!


#3

Thank you very much @naikymen we will add this as part of the documentation. Would anyone in the GOSH community be interested in helping us document not only the design, but all these knowledge and considerations about centrifuges. I think this is as important as documenting an open hardware design or replication.


#4

@naikymen you bring up something very interesting! I don’t know much about centrifuges, but if stability is an issue, one possibility is to have all sample tubes freely floating in a container of water, and spin the container about its axis. The samples behave as though part of the water, so balance is achieved automatically. If cooling is required, then a water cooling system such as used for computers can be employed. with the ports dipping into the water. But given the substantial “water bath”, it could be that cooling won’t be needed.

A side effect is any number of sample tubes (that fit) can be centrifuged at a time, even 1, without having to consider symmetry or balance.

Thanks,
-harold